Date: 4 months ago   Category: Science

There were 12 years. Catastrophic thawing of poles


In recent days scientists declared critical consequences of global warming for all ecosystem. Because of global warming the area of almost all glaciers of the world is reduced, and some of them already completely disappeared. NASA the day before declared almost total disappearance of a long-term Arctic ice cover. Scientists issued the report in which it is said that the mankind had 12 years to stop irreparable injury in connection with warming. Meanwhile, one of the most important glaciers of Antarctica "started singing" about the state. Корреспондент.net tells details. The terrifying songs of Antarctica on October 16 scientists, there are a lot of years studying behavior of a glacier of Ross in Antarctica, published article in Geophysical Research Letters in which told about an interesting phenomenon. The winds blowing constantly in this area of the continent force snow and ice to vibrate and generate almost constant "sounds" which geophysics can use for remote monitoring of a condition of a glacier. Ross's glacier - the largest ice shelf of Antarctica, it is located in the territory of Ross and is given to the Ross Sea of the same name. This glacier is fed with the ices coming from the Transantarctic Mountains, propping up surrounding continental ices and not allowing them to slip to the ocean. If these coastal glaciers collapse, the speed of thawing of all Antarctic ice will sharply grow. Therefore it is extremely important to trace a condition of the shelf. The world on fire. The reasons and consequences of an abnormal heat Against the background of global warming scientists constantly conduct monitoring of various Antarctic glaciers, monitoring their movement, thickness and behavior. Within studying of properties of a glacier of Ross the American scientists installed 34 supersensitive seismic sensors under a snow surface to monitor vibrations of a glacier, to study its structure and the movements. Ross's glacier still was considered as rather stable in comparison with other glaciers of the western Antarctica which is especially subject to thawing of ices. But recently the balance between amount of the thawed and collected ice began to move gradually aside from stable level that creates threat of a collapse of a glacier as it already happened to other glaciers, for example to a glacier Larsen of B. Studying the scientists given from sensors found strange effect - the snow surface constantly creates vibrations. They found out that near the most massive dunes snow cover creates something, reminding a roar, or a huge drum beats. Having accelerated the written-down vibration, scientists synthesized a sound which can remind someone a postscoring for movies of horror. Scientists noticed that vibrations change together with environment conditions - when during strong storms snow dunes are reconstructed or if surface temperature changes. For example, decrease in frequency of vibration says that under a surface there is a thawing of ices. The catastrophic condition of the Arctic in Jet Propulsion Laboratory of NASA was declared on October 11 almost total disappearance of long-term

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